MUROL Volume 2 #33

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World Cheese Encyclopaedia - Each Sunday learn all about a new cheese. 

This week Murol from France. 

Photo: Fromagerie de Grand Murols

Photo: Fromagerie de Grand Murols

Country: France đŸ‡«đŸ‡·

Region: Auvergne

Made from: Cow’s milk

Pasteurised: Yes

Texture: Firm, creamy, springy, elastic

Taste: Mild, milky, sweet, savory

Certification: No

Aging: at least 5 weeks

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Murol, also called Grand Murols, is named after the village in the Auvergne region of France. It is a unique cheese in that it is shaped like a donut – with a hole in the center and also has an intense reddish/orange color. It is said to be the younger brother of the famous Saint-Nectaire cheese which is produced nearby in the same region. Murol is considered a fairly young cheese by French standards, having been created only 70 years ago in the period between the two world wars. 

Murol is a pasteurised, semi-soft, cow's milk cheese with 45% fat. It has a strong aroma but is less pungent than other cheeses from the region. The texture is firm and quite elastic and springy. Murol has a smooth yellow to white paste and a pale orange to red rind which gets its color from being washed with beer and chilies during production. Its flavour is mild, savory, and relatively soft.

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Murol cheese is produced in discs of about 450 grams in weight and 10 to 12 cms in diameter. To distinguish it from Saint Nectaire, a hole was cut in the center of the cheese. Having a hole in the middle also speeds up the affinage - the maturing process – and helps the cheese mature evenly. The plug of cheese that is cut from the center is not discarded – but is wrapped in red paraffin wax and sold separately under the name Murolait or Trou de Murol (Murol hole). 

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History

Photo: plus-de-bulles.fr

Photo: plus-de-bulles.fr

Murol cheeses were created in the early 1900s by a local cheesemaker, Jacques BĂ©rioux who founded La Fromagerie du Grand Murols. He differentiated the cheese from Saint Nectaire by introducing the hole in the middle. The name BĂ©rioux can still be seen on many of the labels and the cheese is often sold as Murol du Grand BĂ©rioux. The fromagerie was taken over by Pierre Dischamp about 20 years ago. 

How to Enjoy It

The soft flavour of Murol goes very nicely with Champagne or with a red Gamay such as a Fleurie.

Sources: Lesnouveauxfromgiers.co.uk, Behind-the-French-Menu, Wikipedia, cheese.com, plus-de-bulles.com, fromages.com

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